Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

In 1997, the Congress amended the Social Security Act for paving the way for the SCHIP, State Children’s Health Insurance Program. Today, condition-based IPUs are proliferating rapidly across many areas of acute and chronic care, from organ transplantation to shoulder care to mental health conditions such as eating disorders. But some experts, it seems, have come to see many of these problems as inevitable in any health-care system—as conditions to be patched up, papered over, or worked around, but not problems to be solved.\n\nLet’s assume you’ll get married in six years, support two children for 20 years, retire at 65, and die at 80. Now let’s make a crazy assumption: insurance premiums, Medicare taxes and premiums, and out-of-pocket costs will grow no faster than your earnings—say, 3 percent a year.\n\nIntegrating mechanisms, such as assigning a single physician team captain for each patient and adopting common scheduling and other protocols, help ensure that well-coordinated, multidisciplinary care is delivered in a cost-effective and convenient way.\n\nAt this stage if they undergo any surgery they will pay 30 % of the cost while the insurance company will pay 70 percent. Some experts worry that requiring people to pay directly for routine care would cause some to put off regular checkups. But market forces cause medical care to expand: both to provide more services to patients and to produce more patients to serve.\n\nSophisticated employers have learned that they must move beyond cost containment and health promotion measures, such as co-pays and on-site health and wellness facilities, and become a greater force in rewarding high-value providers with more patients.