Basic Features Of Health Insurance

Indemnity Health Insurance Coverage is one that gives the policy holders a unique chance to use the services of a medical service provider (it may be a hospital or just the doctor) and share the bill with the insurance firm. As a society, couldn’t we just pay directly for the services required by the poor? Perhaps the greatest problem posed by our health-insurance-driven regime is the sense it creates that someone else is actually paying for most of our health care—and that the costs of new benefits can also be borne by someone else.\n\nA year that began with lumps of coal for the healthcare industry ends with Christmas presents wrapped in ribbons of cautious optimism. You will most likely have an annual deductible to pay before the insurance company starts covering your medical bills. Many hospitals still exist in their current form largely because they are protected by regulation and favored by government payment policies, which effectively maintain the existing industrial structure, rather than encouraging innovation.\n\nThe experience of other developed countries suggests that’s true: the government as single payer would have lower administrative costs than private insurers, as well as enormous market clout and the ability to bring down prices, although at the cost of explicitly rationing care.\n\nEven when functional outcomes are equivalent, patients whose care process is timely and free of chaos, confusion, and unnecessary setbacks experience much better care than those who encounter delays and problems along the way. And whatever their purpose, almost all of these regulations can be shaped over time by the powerful institutions that dominate the health-care landscape, and that are often looking to protect themselves from competition.\n\nWhen a group of doctors proposed a 28-bed private specialty facility, the local hospitals protested to the city council that it was unnecessary, and launched a publicity campaign to try to block it; the council backed the facility anyway So the nonprofit Loma Linda University Medical Center simply bought the new facility for $80 million in 2008.